Evil and omnipotence. Logical Problem of Evil 2019-03-02

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Logical Problem of Evil

evil and omnipotence

Thus the Augustinian theodicist would argue that the problem of evil and suffering is void because God did not create evil; it was man who chose to deviate from the path of perfect goodness. He explains that the existence of evil is a direct contradiction of God being all good. If God were to have a morally sufficient reason for allowing evil, would it be possible for God to be omnipotent, omniscient, perfectly good, and yet for there to be evil and suffering? A wide range of responses have been made against these arguments. What this means is that the number of worlds that we think are logically possible after thinking about the problem of evil turns out to be smaller than the number of worlds that we thought were possible before thinking about the problem of evil. Doubts about the intelligibility of such a plurality arise because of perplexities concerning the individuation and separation of any pair of necessarily indiscernible objects, and because positing the existence of a plurality of such objects is metaphysically extravagant and gratuitous. Most scholars agree that Plantinga's free will of human and non-human spirits demons argument successfully solves the logical problem of evil, proving that God and evil are logically compatible but other scholars explicitly dissent.

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Evil and Omnipotence

evil and omnipotence

For instance, a child, whose parents have been murdered, is given a particular test by God. We must distinguish between first order omnipotence omnipotence 1 , that is unlimited power to act, and second order omnipotence omnipotence 2 , that is unlimited power to determine what powers to act things shall have. The arguments for and against God has prevailed throughout the history of humankind. Because a contradiction can be deduced from statements 1 through 4 and because all theists believe 1 through 4 , atheologians claim that theists have logically inconsistent beliefs. If persecution and starvation did not occur, there would be no reason to consider these acts virtuous.

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J.L. Mackie's Evil and Omnipotence.

evil and omnipotence

This is the goal of his Free Will Defense to be distinguished from a free will theodicy. He gives an example that while it might seem like we need other colors for the color red to exist, it is not necessarily true. Instead, we have a modified, a more complex pattern. However, it is absurd to suppose that any being, no matter how powerful, could draw a round square. However, the following solution that we will explore completely resolves the problem of evil without needing to sacrifice the belief in any of the three ideas. What if there is a good state of affairs that necessarily entails a little evil? That means that a set of statements is logically consistent if and only if that set does not include a direct contradiction and a direct contradiction cannot be deduced from that set.

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Problem of evil

evil and omnipotence

Those who fail and resort to evil by losing hope of success will be punished in the hereafter and maybe even in this world. After all, what mother or father does God have to honor? If the conclusion is true, then perhaps the problem of evil is caused by human moral agents, not the deity or God. However, atheologians claim that statement 13 can also be derived from 1 through 3. People in this world always perform morally good actions, but they deserve no credit for doing so. If, therefore, an analysis implies that certain conceivable beings who are not impressive with respect to their power count as omnipotent, then the analysis is inadequate. Carr; if I did so, it was unintentional. Why bother talking to people like Plantinga who are no better than flat-earthers producing any old rubbish, no matter how ridiculous those arguments would look when applied to other subjects than theology? He must now be prepared to believe, not merely what cannot be proved, but what can be disproved from other beliefs that he also holds.

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Evil and Omnipotence

evil and omnipotence

The fact that these free creatures sometimes go wrong, however, counts neither against God's omnipotence nor against his goodness; for he could have forestalled the occurrence of moral evil only by excising the possibility of moral good. Hick rejects the traditional view of the Fall, which pictures humans as being created in a finitely perfect and finished state from which they disastrously fell away. Everything in the universe could have been red. It may be objected that God's gift of freedom to men does not mean that he cannot control their wills, but that he always refrains from controlling their wills. It does not follow that a maximally powerful being can bring about any state of affairs, since, as observed above, bringing about some such states of affairs is impossible. Some analyses of omnipotence require that an omnipotent being be able to do evil, or to break promises, but God has traditionally been regarded as unable to do these things. The act would not be heroic and inspiring of greater good had no pain been involved.

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Evil and Omnipotence Essay

evil and omnipotence

This leads us to what I call the Paradox of Omnipotence: can an omnipotent being make things which he cannot subsequently control? This view of self's agency of Madhvacharya was, states Buchta, an outlier in Vedanta school and Indian philosophies in general. Now, as a challenge to the all knowing, all benevolent God which of these should not have been allowed? But evil of this sort is the best hope, I think, and maybe the only effective means, for bringing men to such a state. The aptness of Wielenberg's analogy is still open to dispute, and the principle that there are no necessarily unexercised powers continues to be widely accepted. If what is morally good depends on God's choice, then, if God chose something else, that something else would be morally good. So, if one of them were faced with three possible courses of action—two of which were morally good and one of which was morally bad—this person would not be free with respect to the morally bad option.

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Omnipotence (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

evil and omnipotence

This question is central to the problem of evil for theism. Examples of the best people in history show that they had to go through great struggle in their early life! Now, as a challenge to the all knowing, all benevolent God which of these should not have been allowed? Declaration of Independence was issued 232 years before President Obama took office. In order to meet these challenges, it is necessary to say something more precise than to simply affirm that an omnipotent being would be able to do whatever is possible. This is referred to as the inconsistent triad as the existence of evil suggests that God is either willing to help but cannot do so in which case he is not omnipotent or not completely morally perfect omni-benevolent. From 9' through 12' , it is not possible to conclude that God does not exist. To make the conflict more clear, we can combine 1 , 2 and 3 into the following single statement. Most followers of believe that our life on earth is a test for ourselves.

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evil and omnipotence

Something is logically possible just when it can be conceived without contradiction. Let's figure out which of these worlds are possible. I conclude that to make this solution plausible two different senses of 'freedom' must be confused, one sense which will justify the view that freedom is a third order good, more valuable than other goods would be without it, and another sense, sheer randomness, to prevent us from ascribing to God a decision to make men such that they sometimes go wrong when he might have made them such that they would always freely go right. The persecution of Jewish people was not a new phenomenon, and medieval Jewish thinkers had in abstract attempted to reconcile the logical version of the problem of evil. Providence and the Problem of Evil. Does it even mention free-will? My only criticism of Hume is that his arguments are not necessarily timeless.

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Omnipotence

evil and omnipotence

He states that if one accepts that evil exists, then he cannot accept that God is both omnipotent and morally perfect. But there could not be two coexistent omnipotent agents. A wholly good being desires no evil 5. For example, a person who chooses to put in hard work and sacrifices some fun during college life, his or her return in the end will be much greater. Finally, no analog to the McEar objection arises for the Leibniz-Ross theory.

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